Survey of Retention Policies

A retention policy for electronically stored information is a definition of how long one will keep a certain type of information before it’s destroyed. Eg, perhaps you keep tax records for 7 years, intellectual property material for 15 years. Or perhaps you keep everything for an indeterminate period.

You can see retention policies for various organizations here–see comments further down this page. If you add your own data, we will send you a summary of the findings. Please either post your response as a comment, or if you need anonymity, email it to survey@ferris.com and we’ll post your response without identifying you.

Many thanks–David Ferris


Quick Retention Policy Survey

Q1. Rough # people in your organization/company?

Q2. What is your title and what do you do?

Q3. What type of business/industry are you in?

Q4. What are your retention policies?

Q5. Did any internal policies, laws and/or regulations have impact on your retention policies? If so, which?

Q6. What advice would you give to peers trying to formulate and implement their retention policies?

Q7. How will your retention policies change over the next few years?

Q8. What are the main archiving products/services you use? If you have a home-grown solution, please tell us about it.

Q9. Are there additional retention-related questions on your mind, or do you have any other comments?


25 Comment

  1. Posted February 29, 2008 at 9:16 AM | Permalink

    (Emailed in so have removed the person’s contact info to preserve anonymity)

    Quick Retention Policy Survey

    Q1. 20 people in company

    Q2. What retention policies do you have?
    ***We are a privately held company so we manage more on space needs than anything. We really don’t have a formal policy as we only have a little over 20 users and it’s more on an individual basis.

    Q3. What internal policies, laws and/or regulations have greatest impact on your retention policies?
    ***None

    Q4. What advice would you give to peers trying to formulate their retention policies?
    ***Know the answer to #2 above. Make sure you have a team made up of Legal and IT and each understands the other’s policies. If you don’t know how you are affected, you have no idea what to keep. Make sure you have a strong backing to your policy. Also, find a solution that gives ease of use for the end user to access there data, and ease of use for Legal to get what they need.

    Q5. How will your retention policies change over the next few years?
    ***Depends on the industry demands and our growth.

    Q6. What are the most important best practices associated with successfully implementing a retention policy?
    ***1. Have a solid understanding of what you want/need for your organization
    2. Have a solid backing from Legal & IT
    3. Think about the data and how it will be needed 1 month, 1 year or 5 years from now. If you don’t have the data, you can’t provide it to legal when they need it.
    4. Find a solution that knows what they are talking about. They don’t have to be the most expensive with a lot of hardware, you simply need to find one that works best for your environment. Make sure the company understands the platform they are working with. There are a lot of vendors who say they can archive from particular platforms, but don’t know the first thing about being an admin of that environment.

    Q7. What are the main archiving products/services you use?
    ****Mail Attender for Lotus Notes (Sherpa)

  2. dferris
    Posted March 4, 2008 at 10:00 AM | Permalink

    Response in which sender identification has been removed to respect his/her anonymity:

    Q1. What retention policies do you have?
    * We have a dedicated retention policy for E-Mail messages:
    * Deletion after 90 days in mailbox (voice messages from UM systems: 15 days)
    * Retention of 3 years if archived by user. Deletion taken place only when a message hasn’t been looked up since 13 months. No UM messages in archive, no private messages in archive.
    * Messages which express or carry legal obligations, legal commitments and such have to be stored outside of E-Mail mailboxes and E-Mail archive in other archiving applications, which comply with the appropriate legislation resp. regulation.

    Q2. What internal policies, laws and/or regulations have greatest impact on your retention policies?
    * Governed primarily considerations of risk control in litigation of legal departments, secondary is GxP regulations

    Q3. What advice would you give to peers trying to formulate their retention policies?

    Define clearly the purpose of any retention policy. If the requestor is not IT, then make clear that IT just acts on behalf… Keep it simple. Try to maintain a ‘one size fits all’ approach.

    Q4. How will your retention policies change over the next few years?

    Nothing planned. But high level litigation cases in the pharma business might have an impact to adjust our retention policy.

    Q5. What are the most important best practices associated with successfully implementing a retention policy?

    Clear communication about its purpose and what it entails for the user. The more it requires changes of user behavior, the more a buy-in and commitment of the entire business management hierarchy becomes important. Real top management commitment is advantageous. Well thought through and careful preparation of the rollout is a must. Calculate more effort on PR, communication, training than on the technical implementations.

    Q6. What are the main archiving products/services you use?

    Zantaz EAS

  3. Posted March 6, 2008 at 2:17 PM | Permalink

    Hi All,

    Interesting and highly relevant question to the industry as a whole David. Regarding email retention, why would you not retain all email forever? The only acceptable answers are:

    1. Storage Capacity.

    2. A regulation that states a maximum period of retention – (not sure I know of one actually – anybody else know of such a reg? i know of regs where when you delete it – it must be deleted properly but that’s different).

    3. something I can’t think of!

    Most ‘normal’ users DO NOT retrieve email from their archive because they are being sued, because regulations dictate they do so, because courts demand it, or because of federal or government requests it. Most email archiving email retrievals are performed because users are either trying to retrieve some information or recall what was said, perhaps dig out a contact. In other words, they use the archive in the same way they use their current email folders – that were sadly architected so long ago that, in the case of Microsoft Outlook are an anachronism to the needs of the modern email user. So for ‘normal’ non-privileged employees, it’s an extended filling cabinet that resolves or mitigates the design constraints of existing email products. You never know when you want to go back for that email someone sent you 3 or 4 years ago. Clearly it becomes less relevant the further you go back. But what you don’t want to do is be sure that you had the email, but not be able

    Most privileged users DO retrieve information for audits, H.R. requests, or other legal action (defense or prosecution). Here, temporal factual accounts of the exchanges of email, the parties, and the metadata are vital for proving a case. The mistake that many make is to believe that if they delete their email after a short retention period, that – Phew! It’s gone! Wrong! It’s only gone (assuming NSA grade logical block overwrite policy is in force) from your infrastructure. Not from the infrastructure of other parties involved in an email exchange.

    Having a retention policy should be as simple as stating at what point do you remove all of the email from an archive (after 7 years for example) – and NOT should you retain information from Sales for n years and from Engineering for y. It is not realistically possible to distinguish the nature of a single email asit pertains to multiple regulations.

    It’s all or nothing! Please discuss!

    Kind regards

    Ralph Harvey
    CEO FCS -the Cryoserver people

  4. dferris
    Posted April 3, 2008 at 12:48 AM | Permalink

    (Emailed in so have removed the person’s contact info to preserve anonymity)

    Q1. Rough # people in your organization/company? 105,000

    Q2. What type of business/industry are you in? education

    Q3. What is your retention policy? Do not have one

    Q4. Did any internal policies, laws and/or regulations have impact on your retention policies? If so, which? no

    Q5. What advice would you give to peers trying to formulate and implement their retention policies? Need a policy that is implementable and that meets legal requirements

    Q6. How will your retention policies change over the next few years? We will have one

    Q7. What are the main archiving products/services you use? If you have a home-grown solution, please tell us about it. Enterprise Vault

  5. dferris
    Posted April 13, 2008 at 6:28 AM | Permalink

    (Have removed the person’s contact info to preserve anonymity)

    Q1. Rough # people in your organization/company? 500+

    Q2. What type of business/industry are you in? City Government

    Q3. What is your retention policy? See attached

    Q4. Did any internal policies, laws and/or regulations have impact on your retention policies? If so, which? We are currently working on expanding our document imaging system and implementing a new retention policy.

    Q5. What advice would you give to peers trying to formulate and implement their retention policies? Take a sales and marketing class

    Q6. How will your retention policies change over the next few years? It will probably take about a year to inventory and implement and by then we will need to update it

    Q7. What are the main archiving products/services you use? If you have a home-grown solution, please tell us about it. LibertyNET Imaging is used for about 5 departments in the city. Other than that it is departmental

    Q8. Are there additional retention-related questions on your mind? (will likely be added to this discussion topics list so others can respond) How do others enforce their policy? Other than threatening employees? Incentives???

  6. Tony Whitby
    Posted April 15, 2008 at 7:14 AM | Permalink

    Q1. Rough # people in your organization/company? 8000

    Q2. What type of business/industry are you in? Manufacturing

    Q3. What is your retention policy? None (at present)

    Q4. Did any internal policies, laws and/or regulations have impact on your retention policies? If so, which? Yes, SOX

    Q5. What advice would you give to peers trying to formulate and implement their retention policies?

    Q6. How will your retention policies change over the next few years? Attempting to formulate now

    Q7. What are the main archiving products/services you use? If you have a home-grown solution, please tell us about it.
    At present just local Groupwise personal archives, Evaluating M+Archive right now

    Q8. Are there additional retention-related questions on your mind? (will likely be added to this discussion topics list so others can respond)
    As we are just formulating our policy I would be interested to know of others actual experience. Do people have a fixed retention period for all mail (say 2 yrs) and allow users to mark other for longer retention or use mail content to determine retention. Or just keep everything for 10 years then delete it?

  7. Teresa Werner
    Posted April 16, 2008 at 8:16 AM | Permalink

    Q1. About 180

    Q2. I am a contract consultant. I am assisting my client in the implementation of a RM program.

    Q3. Consulting; currently for a water authority.

    Q4. We have 11 Retention Schedules that contain 225 record series (types)

    Q5. Yes, about 98% of them. Are you asking which record types or what laws? Either way, there are too many to mention.

    Q6. Triple the time you ‘think’ it will take because it potentially involves everyone in your organization and your will have to work on ‘their’ time if you want cooperation. Realize you will have to dig up records from the most bizarre places. Develop tactics for getting answers out of different personality types. Don’t be surprised when they only tell you 25% of what they have (or know). Remind them that you need to know about records they no longer create, but still have stored because you need authority to destroy them. Drill it into their heads constantly, that its not the media, its the content! Be prepared, that unless you have complete top management support and have the BEST RM professional leading disposition efforts, you will be lucky if 5% of your organization follows the retention policy.

    Q7. Retention policies should change every year. New records will be created, laws will change, policy will change, organization/responsibility structures will change, you will uncover record types they ‘forgot’ to tell you about, you will uncover new record types in closets, basements, attics, utility rooms, etc. You will find yourself in a legal discovery and re-evaluate your policy, you will realize that there are databases, electronic files, e-mail that you never knew existed, you will find cds, video tapes, microfilm and have to review them for new record types, etc.

    Q8. Archiving products? Do you mean enterprise records and information management/content management solutions? We use the new Oracle version of Stellent to manage and track the disposition of our records and information.

    Q9. Always. There will never NOT be more questions. My only comment is that your questions were very vague so I am not sure how the answers can possibly help you as there was no clear ‘goal’ identified as to what you plan to do with the information collected. Do you have ‘survey results’ on your retention schedule? How long do you plan on keeping these? 🙂

  8. Peter
    Posted April 30, 2008 at 3:08 AM | Permalink

    Q1 – 4000 in our Division, 26,000 in group

    Q2 – IT Compliance & Forensic Analyst. Forenscis means investigating individual computer incidents (mostly checking leavers’ PCs). Compliance means – well, complying with legislation, industry and internal standards

    Q3 – Energy Services

    Q4 – None really, see Q8

    Q5 – N/A

    Q6 – Keep it as simple as possible. Speak to users, not just managers. Make sure it’s technically and practically possible to implement. Be prepared for resistance, change, and constant monitoring.

    Q7 – Hopefully we’ll get some!

    Q8 – Symantec Enterprise Vault currently being rolled out for Exchange, all archived email will kept in perpetuity. File archiving with EV didn’t work, looking at other options compatible with our SAN.

  9. dferris
    Posted April 30, 2008 at 9:55 PM | Permalink

    (Have removed the person’s contact info to preserve anonymity)

    Q1. Rough # people in your organization/company? 200

    Q2. What is your title and what do you do? EVP ISO & Loan Operations

    Q3. What type of business/industry are you in? Banking

    Q4. What are your retention policies? 90 days for e-mail in your in-box or sent-box. 18 months for all other docs & archived e-mail unless it is labeled “keep permanently”

    Q5. Did any internal policies, laws and/or regulations have impact on your retention policies? If so, which? Yes- all

    Q6. What advice would you give to peers trying to formulate and implement their retention policies? Involve legal counsel

    Q7. How will your retention policies change over the next few years? This is a new policy so we will find out if it works or needs to be adjusted

    Q8. What are the main archiving products/services you use? If you have a home-grown solution, please tell us about it. Microsoft Outlook, SAN

    Q9. Are there additional retention-related questions on your mind, or do you have any other comments? Enforcement & Training

  10. dferris
    Posted April 30, 2008 at 9:56 PM | Permalink

    (Have removed the person’s contact info to preserve anonymity)

    Q1. Rough # people in your organization/company? 150

    Q2. What is your title and what do you do? VP/IT Manager

    Q3. What type of business/industry are you in? Banking

    Q4. What are your retention policies? We currently follow FDIC and Tax laws

    Q5. Did any internal policies, laws and/or regulations have impact on your retention policies? If so, which? FDIC, Tax, and State laws

    Q6. What advice would you give to peers trying to formulate and implement their retention policies? We have a lot of work ahead of us

    Q7. How will your retention policies change over the next few years? They will change a lot

    Q8. What are the main archiving products/services you use? If you have a home-grown solution, please tell us about it. We use normal backup software along with an archiving software for email

    Q9. Are there additional retention-related questions on your mind, or do you have any other comments?

  11. Posted June 4, 2008 at 2:24 PM | Permalink

    Q1 – 8,500 employees

    Q2 – Paralegal

    Q3 – Manufacturing

    Q4 – In the process of drafting a global policy. Currently have many misc schedules produced by the different disciplines.

    Q5 – Currently looking at internal policies (business practices and the laws, including non-US laws) to determine the global policy

    Q6 – Keep it simple and involve all players

    Q7 – Will change to address new laws and new business concerns

    Q8 – None currently

    Q9 – no

  12. Posted June 15, 2008 at 2:47 PM | Permalink

    Q1. Rough # people in your organization/company?
    33

    Q2. What is your title and what do you do?
    IT Manager – I do Computer Network Support and Notes/Domino Support/Development, plus manage our IT Infrastructure.

    Q3. What type of business/industry are you in?
    Finance

    Q4. What are your retention policies?
    All email is Retained forever, inbound and outbound.

    Q5. Did any internal policies, laws and/or regulations have impact on your retention policies? If so, which?
    Sarbanes-Oxley “woke us up” to the issues although we’d been considering the problem for a while prior to that.

    Q6. What advice would you give to peers trying to formulate and implement their retention policies?
    If you can’t locate something within about 30 minutes, then there’s no point keeping it. Indexing and subject categorisation is just as important as archiving.

    Q7. How will your retention policies change over the next few years?
    At the moment all our mail is online on our main server but we’ll be moving things across to an archive server in the next six months.

    Q8. What are the main archiving products/services you use? If you have a home-grown solution, please tell us about it.
    Convergence AbilitySuite – A NZ Product which runs on Lotus Notes Domino. (See: http://www.convergence.co.nz/).

    Q9. Are there additional retention-related questions on your mind, or do you have any other comments?
    No. We are very happy with our solution.

  13. dferris
    Posted June 16, 2008 at 10:05 AM | Permalink

    Here’s a response, anonymity requested:

    Q1. Rough # people in your organization/company?–5000

    Q2. What is your title and what do you do?–Sr Technical Consultant, messaging and collaboration

    Q3. What type of business/industry are you in?–Insurance

    Q4. What are your retention policies?–60 days for email, 365 days for calendar

    Q5. Did any internal policies, laws and/or regulations have impact on your retention policies? If so, which?–None that I have been asked to implement.

    Q6. What advice would you give to peers trying to formulate and implement their retention policies?–It’s much easier to give then to take away. A restrictive policy (combined with heavy communications and training), implemented correctly, which will be much easier to adjust, than one that is too long, resulting in frequent decreases in the retention periods, making users frustrated multiple times.

    Q7. How will your retention policies change over the next few years?–We are looking at time periods shorter than 60 days for general email, with options to selectively retain email longer than that within an archiving system.

    Q8. What are the main archiving products/services you use? If you have a home-grown solution, please tell us about it.–AXS-ONE

    Q9. Are there additional retention-related questions on your mind, or do you have any other comments?–I am constantly getting asked about how long other organizations keep email, in addition to how long and if they are allowed to ‘archive’ email, locally or on a server (and how long). If this survey helps with that, great!

  14. dferris
    Posted June 16, 2008 at 11:33 AM | Permalink

    Another submitted and respondent requested anonymity (PS I like this person!)/David

    Q1. Rough # people in your organization/company?–9000

    Q2. What is your title and what do you do?–Manager, Desktop Computing Services; project manager for Exchange upgrade projects

    Q3. What type of business/industry are you in?–Manufacturing/electronics

    Q4. What are your retention policies?–have no policy – users determine what email they are going to keep and what not. We archive to PSTs (on user’s hard drives).

    Q5. Did any internal policies, laws and/or regulations have impact on your retention policies?–no internal policies; FRCP does have an impact, but our legal department has not yet published policies to address it. If so, which?

    Q6. What advice would you give to peers trying to formulate and implement their retention policies?

    Q7. How will your retention policies change over the next few years?–I believe we will have a formal retention policy, and users will not be able to decide what mail to keep, how long to keep it, and where to keep it. I believe we will start ratcheting down the retention period (10 years to start; then a year later, 9 years; then 8 years, etc.

    Q8. What are the main archiving products/services you use? If you have a home-grown solution, please tell us about it.–For our Exchange mail users, some users have mail delivered directly to PSTs (no mail on exchange server is Outlook is open); others autoarchive. We currently have a very low mailbox size quote (50MB for most users); moving to larger mailboxes when we upgrade to Exchange 2007. Users archive to PSTs on their own hard drives. we also have a thousand or so Unix mail users; Corporate IS does not run those mail systems or manage those clients, so have no visibility into retention policies.

    Q9. Are there additional retention-related questions on your mind, or do you have any other comments?–I would love to know what other companies have for retention policies and how long mail is retained; how they implemented / gained acceptance for retention policies.

  15. dferris
    Posted June 27, 2008 at 2:03 PM | Permalink

    Another submitted and respondent requested anonymity

    Q1. Rough # people in your organization/company? 79000

    Q2. What is your title and what do you do? Sr. System Administrator / Managing Exchange and Enterprise Vault

    Q3. What type of business/industry are you in? Government/Military

    Q4. What are your retention policies? Journaling keep 6 months / Email keep indefinite, users not allowed to delete items from archive

    Q5. Did any internal policies, laws and/or regulations have impact on your retention policies? If so, which? yes, Journal policy. Illegal to keep journals over 6 months

    Q6. What advice would you give to peers trying to formulate and implement their retention policies? Get them right the first time!

    Q7. How will your retention policies change over the next few years? Not

    Q8. What are the main archiving products/services you use? If you have a home-grown solution, please tell us about it. Enterprise Vault 2007 SP2

    Q9. Are there additional retention-related questions on your mind, or do you have any other comments?

  16. dferris
    Posted July 1, 2008 at 6:53 AM | Permalink

    Another anonymous posting:

    Q1. Rough # people in your organization/company? ~ 3,000

    Q2. What is your title and what do you do? ~ Director of Compliance

    Q3. What type of business/industry are you in? ~ Professional Services

    Q4. What are your retention policies? ~ Data Destruction / Retention Schedules / Permissible Use / Employee Handbook / Code of Conduct

    Q5. Did any internal policies, laws and/or regulations have impact on your retention policies? If so, which? ~ Yes; our policies incorporate federal and state law, regulatory schemes, and statutes of limitation for many jurisdictions; additionally, our internal policies often provide for more stringent data classification and security handling protocols than local, state, or federal law.

    Q6. What advice would you give to peers trying to formulate and implement their retention policies? ~ Involve legal early in the draft process; socialize the schedule after legal’s first draft; include IT in the socialization and the policy language itself (to ensure practicability).

    Q7. How will your retention policies change over the next few years? ~ Annual revisits to ensure currency.

    Q8. What are the main archiving products/services you use? If you have a home-grown solution, please tell us about it. ~ Principally email archiving; destruction handled ad hoc with an annual “Spring cleaning” exercise.

    Q9. Are there additional retention-related questions on your mind, or do you have any other comments? ~ None

  17. dferris
    Posted July 1, 2008 at 6:56 AM | Permalink

    Another anonymous posting.

    1. 3000
    2. Email Admin
    3. Transportation
    4. backups kept for 5 weeks, all email not archived purged after 120 days
    5. no
    6. none
    7. unknown
    8. GroupWise Archive, user based, archives to file server storage
    9. no

  18. Posted July 3, 2008 at 8:06 AM | Permalink

    Q1. 500

    Q2. Sr. Program Manager, Enterprise Messaging

    Q3. Consulting & Services

    Q4. 2yrs

    Q5. no

    Q6. Focus heavily on the business reasons for archiving. If the project is being driven by IT, evaluate who in the business will have an opinion when archiving is available and solicit their input up front. This will save re-deigning the system later. If the project is being driven by the business, ensure you are accounting for all of the regulations and other potential influences on the policy. Without knowing these two factors, plan for 10 years (in terms of capacity), and implement for 7 years.

    Q7. Our retention policies are not expected to change over the coming years. For a lot of publicly traded corporations, revisions and interpretations to legislature will affect retention policies. As a company, re-evaluating the retention practices every year or two in relation to the changing regulations makes a lot of sense.

    Q8. We really like Exchange 2007’s policies in conjunction with a solid archiving product. We have been able to customize what we archive and how to meet all the different requirements of our userbase.

    Q9. When will we see some computing standards come out of the whole archiving world?

  19. dferris
    Posted July 9, 2008 at 9:29 AM | Permalink

    Another response that requested anonymity…many thanks.

    Q1. Rough # people in your organization/company? 10,500

    Q2. What is your title and what do you do? Assistant Director, direct server infrastructure (email, web,
    file and print) staff

    Q3. What type of business/industry are you in? Higher Education

    Q4. What are your retention policies? Quota limits only with management up to the end-user.

    Q5. Did any internal policies, laws and/or regulations have impact on
    your retention policies? If so, which? Dealing with the issues has been actively avoided.

    Q6. What advice would you give to peers trying to formulate and
    implement their retention policies? Decide where responsibility lies.

    Q7. How will your retention policies change over the next few years? There will be internal and external pressure to create and apply
    them.

    Q8. What are the main archiving products/services you use? If you have
    a home-grown solution, please tell us about it. No archiving in volume.

    Q9. Are there additional retention-related questions on your mind, or
    do you have any other comments?vNo.

  20. dferris
    Posted July 16, 2008 at 2:21 AM | Permalink

    Another response that wishes anonymity:

    Q1. Rough # people in your organization/company? 133k

    Q2. What is your title and what do you do? Messaging Engineer: Currently, Compliance/Retention/Archiving Engineer

    Q3. What type of business/industry are you in? Banking

    Q4. What are your retention policies?
    Rough estimate.
    * 80% – 1 year
    * 13%- 6 year
    * 3%- 3 Year
    * 2%- Exception- any LOB that falls into an indefinite retention period or legal hold.

    Q5. Did any internal policies, laws and/or regulations have impact on your retention policies? If so, which? SEC Regulations, Internal legal direction. LOB’s preferences. We are exploring the international regulatory requirements around retention and archiving.

    Q6. What advice would you give to peers trying to formulate and implement their retention policies? Keep it simple, clearly state policy and enforce it.

    Q7. How will your retention policies change over the next few years? We will change policy when regulations change or at the direction of our LOB’s.

    Q8. What are the main archiving products/services you use? If you have a home-grown solution, please tell us about it. CA Assentor for Supervision; ZLTI for Mailbox management. We are currently evaluating as System of Record.

    Q9. Are there additional retention-related questions on your mind, or do you have any other comments? What are our peers doing. I have feedback from legal, I’d like to vet with other organizations.

  21. dferris
    Posted July 24, 2008 at 10:11 AM | Permalink

    Another posting, with identifying info removed. Thanks!

    Quick Retention Policy Survey

    Q1. Rough # people in your organization/company? 50,000

    Q2. What is your title and what do you do? Systems Admin and Engineering

    Q3. What type of business/industry are you in? Insurance, Financial Services, Banking

    Q4. What are your retention policies? ~15,000 users in scope for Retention (Broker Dealers, Investment Advisors and Associated Personnel). ~5,000 users in scope for content management (messages/attachments evaluated for matches on a lexicon oriented to trading terms.

    Q5. Did any internal policies, laws and/or regulations have impact on your retention policies? If so, which? Yes. Finra, SOX, Internal legal holds, litigation legal holds

    Q6. What advice would you give to peers trying to formulate and implement their retention policies? Lawyers, technicians, business analysts and senior management should all be at the table from day 1 when evaluating compliance/retention solutions.

    Q7. How will your retention policies change over the next few years? Scrutinize the population of in-scope users; verify that appropriate retention periods are applied according to business function.

    Q8. What are the main archiving products/services you use? If you have a home-grown solution, please tell us about it. Legato EmailXtender for Archiving, Legato EmailXaminer for Content Management

    Q9. Are there additional retention-related questions on your mind, or do you have any other comments? With the rollout of IBM’s new collaboration products (Quickr, Connections, integrated Sametime client), we are in great need of a) legal interpretations as to what is in scope for retention; and b) what products are available to meet those needs.

  22. dferris
    Posted August 27, 2008 at 8:35 AM | Permalink

    Anonymous posting:

    Q1. Rough # people in your organization/company?–2000

    Q2. What is your title and what do you do?–Enterprise Records Manager – I create and administer records retention policy.

    Q3. What type of business/industry are you in?–Manufacturer and on-line retailer of health and wellness products.

    Q4. What are your retention policies?–My position is new to the company (4 months) so we are still in the process of creating retention policies.

    Q5. Did any internal policies, laws and/or regulations have impact on your retention policies? If so, which?–We are mainly governed by the FDA.

    Q6. What advice would you give to peers trying to formulate and implement their retention policies?–Stick to it – it gets better with time.

    Q7. How will your retention policies change over the next few years?–Not much.

    Q8. What are the main archiving products/services you use? If you have a home-grown solution, please tell us about it.–We are in the process of purchasing Symantec for email, File System Archiving and SharePoint Archiving. We are also looking at EMC Documentum for BPM and WCM.

  23. dferris
    Posted December 23, 2008 at 1:56 AM | Permalink

    From Mary Mizrahi:

    Q1. Rough # people in your organization/company?–30

    Q2. What is your title and what do you do?–Product Manager for our ASAV product (appliance and hosted)

    Q3. What type of business/industry are you in?–Software

    Q4. What are your retention policies?–None.

    Q5. Did any internal policies, laws and/or regulations have impact on your retention policies? If so, which?–No.

    Q6. What advice would you give to peers trying to formulate and implement their retention policies?–Review internal user needs as well as compliance laws such as SOX.

    Q7. How will your retention policies change over the next few years?–As we grow I would imagine that we would start to have a retention policy.

    Q8. What are the main archiving products/services you use? If you have a home-grown solution, please tell us about it.–none.

    Q9. Are there additional retention-related questions on your mind, or do you have any other comments?–None.

  24. dferris
    Posted May 1, 2009 at 6:30 PM | Permalink

    Here’s another response:

    Q1. Rough # people in your organization/company? 140

    Q2. What retention policies do you have? Paper – nothing re. electronic

    Q3. What internal policies, laws and/or regulations have greatest impact on your retention policies? Local, state, federal codes

    Q4. What advice would you give to peers trying to formulate their retention policies? I’m looking for advice

    Q5. How will your retention policies change over the next few years? Initial implementation re. Exchange store

    Q6. What are the most important best practices associated with successfully implementing a retention policy? Involvement of IT, HR, Legal

    Q7. What are the main archiving products/services you use? Archive Attendant

  25. Posted August 8, 2011 at 4:58 PM | Permalink

    I find this quite interesting that no one mentioned that e-mail should be considered as communication tool rather than a storage median.

2 Trackbacks

  1. By Retention Policy Survey » Archiving101.com on February 29, 2008 at 3:17 PM

    […] Ferris has a survey going on right now on retention policies.  The original post is at http://email-museum.com/2008/02/28/retention-policy-survey/ but if you could add your own experience then this would help them out greatly.   […]

  2. […] David Ferris, of Ferris Research, is conducting a retention policy survey. If your company or client takes part, they can receive a summary of the findings. This entry is filed under Miscellaneous. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site. Leave a Reply […]

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