HP’s IAP Archiving–An Update

HP's archiving has gone quiet for the last two years. During this time, the company has been mulling over its plans, and refining its marketing messages and internal sales and support procedures. Here's a quick summary of the situation:

  • Originally known as RISS, more recently as Integrated Archiving Platform (IAP).
  • Currently supports Exchange (including calendar and task items, shared folders), Notes email, files, and databases.
  • Future support planned for SharePoint, instant messaging, and ECM systems.
  • Main reasons to buy: storage management (worldwide), plus compliance and e-discovery in U.S.
  • Always sold as hardware and software bundle.
  • Pricing:
    • The list price of the IAP base system, which provides up to 6.3TB of integrated storage, is $70,300 (includes the first year of maintenance support). The IAP is priced on capacity and object ingestion, the latter being the biggest variable between customers. The HP Email Archiving software for Microsoft Exchange or Lotus Domino is priced per user and sold in 500 and 10,000 license to use (LTU) increments. The first year of software support must be purchased.
    • For example, for 5,000 Exchange users, a system with 1GB of storage per user, and limited professional services, would list at about $400,000; i.e., $8/user. After the first year, 22% maintenance applies.
  • Main competition: Symantec, Autonomy, Mimosa, CommVault, and EMC.
  • Most sales to enterprises are direct; most sales to medium-sized organizations (say 3,000 to 10,000 employees) are via resellers.

In our view, the most interesting aspects of the offering are:

  • Integrated hardware and software solution, usually along with professional services.
  • Scalability: up to 450TB, billions of objects, 100,000+ users, largely due to the underlying grid architecture and the built-in indexing and other storage intelligence.
  • Fast query and retrieval, largely due to built-in indexing and other storage intelligence.
  • Tight integration of software and hardware. This implies various benefits; e.g., more reliable retention policy implementation, more reliable chain of custody, and greater certainty about access controls.

... David Ferris

One Comment

  1. Posted June 17, 2009 at 6:02 PM | Permalink

    … >>Integrated hardware and software solution, usually along with professional services.> Tight integration of software and hardware. This implies various benefits; e.g., more reliable retention policy implementation, more reliable chain of custody, and greater certainty about access controls.

    I rather would go for an open interface like NetApp Snaplock or EMC Centera. You can re-use for other applications or a different archiving software (Mergers!) and have a well tested and publicly documented interface, which gives you at least the same confidence that this will be accepted in court, then a proprietary one…

    (Check-out DoJ vs. CREW where the Department of justice produced the evidence with EV and EMC Centera)

    Regards

    Daniel

  2. Susan
    Posted July 24, 2009 at 1:03 AM | Permalink

    Good information Dave. Thank you. I hadn’t originally considered the pro’s of the integrated hardware/software solution, but instead, like Daniel, had viewed this as a negative, black box, type factor. I do see the pro on decreased complexity and potentially increased speed you point out. From a scalability perspective, do any of the competing products(like Symantec Vault software with EMC Centera hardware) scale less, the same or higher? I would think they would scale larger than 450 TB, since the Centera can be expanded to multiple PBs…I’m just not sure of the Symantec Vault software limitations for the combined solution. Do you know what your options are with IAP when you hit the 450TB mark? Is it like a Centera where you can just add another cabinet, or is this a fixed limitation of some aspect of the integrated architecture? Do you know of a good (current) comparative archive matrix around products supported (Exchange, notes, SharePoint, etc.), scalability, security, data compression ratio, cost (high, medium, low), search features (advanced, limited, crude;)), speed, and compliance features by country? I suppose this would be complex to put together since you have integrated and non-integrated solutions to consider, some with hardware providing “compliance” features and others with software providing this.

  3. dferris
    Posted July 24, 2009 at 1:11 AM | Permalink

    Susan–Your posting raises a number of interesting topics–can we chat by phone on them? If you’d like to, please email me at david.ferris@ferris.com and let me know the number to call you on. Or you can get me on +1 415 367 3436.
    –david

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